David Moore’s Garden Diary for late March

By David Moore

Flowering shrubs and perennial borders are a renewable resource — pleasure and beauty which are free after the first year. (Photos taken March 28, 2009.)

(To see a larger version of any of these photos, click on the thumbnail.)

Advertisements

1 Response to “David Moore’s Garden Diary for late March”


  1. 1 Jeannie Momberg April 13, 2009 at 16:59

    Nice David; a sense of knowing that our enviroments nurtured over time gives pleasures beyound the hectic race of ‘how much more or less’.
    I’m a newbie in Lund over & of the past decade and love watching the bees return to my gardens and hearing the frogs in glee despite land developements. Ahh! When the hummingbirds & piliated woodpeckers exist… the eagles, heron and ravens demand attention! Thier nesting is so valuable in our inner coastal regions for food security.
    I feed just me as a human and meagerly create enviros for the bees, the birds and aquatic species! My community is small and there are children to feed. I endevour to support the efforts of thier parents!

    Kindly,
    Jeannie


Comments are currently closed.



Post facto

March 2009
M T W T F S S
« Feb   Apr »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

RSS recent posts: dmitry orlov

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

slow tweets…

Creative Commons License
The content of this blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.5 Canada License.

%d bloggers like this: